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Turkey-based non-profit scientific research organisation, Soley Biotechnology Institute, has developed an X-12 protection product that can increase the shelf life of fresh cheese.

The shelf-life of fresh and low-salted cheese is significantly short, between one and three weeks, even if kept in a cold temperature.

This occurs due to the ability of bacteria and fungi present in the air to multiply quickly on the cheese surface, thereby resulting in their decay.

The research organisation had started its research with a fund of $20m to discover a way of preventing water from penetrating cheese without high-salinity in order to avoid microbial formation on cheese.

It is reported that salt is not only used to add taste but also to prevent microbial and fungal accumulation on cheese surface.

After four years of research and development (R&D) and by using nanotechnology methods, Soley Biotechnology Institute has successfully discovered an X-12 protection-water that comprises natural compounds.

The X-12 induced water can cover the entire surface area of the cheese.

This layer forms a barrier between the cheese surface and air, thereby preventing it from decay.

X-12, through certain organic nano-wire style substances, forms a matrix like gel-type binder solution added with some organic preservatives as well as organic antioxidants.

"The research organisation had started its research with a fund of $20m to discover a way of preventing water from penetrating cheese without high-salinity in order to avoid microbial formation on cheese."

Adding this product into water creates a barrier that works only on the surface of the cheese.

This solution prevents cheese producers from using high-salinity brine to protect cheese from decaying early.

The X-12 product prevents desiccation, the excessive absorption of water, loss of calcium and protein, and the formation of faulty tissues.

It protects the cheese from effects of ultra violet (UV) and infra red (IR) lights.


Image: A wheel of cheese. Photo: courtesy of Suat Eman / Freedigitalphotos.