The Mayor of London Sadiq Khan has confirmed that beginning 25 February, junk food advertising will be banned on the entire Transport for London (TfL) network.

The move is said to be part of the measures taken by the government to tackle child obesity, as well as promote a healthy lifestyle among Londoners.

In May, a public consultation was launched to ban advertisements featuring food and non-alcoholic drinks high in fat, salt and/or sugar and considered less healthy under Public Health England guidelines.

Khan said: “Child obesity is putting the lives of young Londoners at risk and placing huge pressure on our already strained health service.

“It is absolutely imperative that we take tough action against this ticking timebomb now, and reducing exposure to junk food advertising has a role to play in this, not just for children, but parents, families and carers who buy food and prepare meals.

"Child obesity is putting the lives of young Londoners at risk and placing huge pressure on our already strained health service."

“It’s clear that advertising plays a huge part in the choices we make, whether we realise it or not, and Londoners have shown overwhelming support for a ban on adverts for junk food and drink on our transport network.”

The advertisements featuring sugary drinks, cheeseburgers, chocolate bars and salted nuts will be banned, while unsalted nuts, raisins and sugar-free drinks would be accepted.

Additionally, restaurants, takeaways, delivery services and food beverage brands are allowed to display adverts which promote their healthier products, rather than simply publicising brands.

TfL Transport Strategy director Lilli Matson said: “As the capital’s strategic transport authority, we have a crucial role in the health of Londoners. We also have a large advertising estate with a very diverse audience covering all ages.

“By only allowing healthier foods and drink to be advertised across our network, we will utilise our assets to help make London a healthier place. This builds on the work that we already do to improve health and make our city a better place through encouraging people to choose more active and sustainable ways of travelling around the city.”