Tyson Foods Incubation Centre, Arkansas, United States of America


Tyson Foods incubation centre

Continuing its tradition of investment in Springdale, Arkansas, US, Tyson Foods, one of the world's biggest food companies, started construction of a new incubation centre in May 2016.

By providing hatching operations, the facility will support Tyson Food's Northwest Arkansas broiler chicken business. It will replace the company's operations in Lincoln and the Randall Wobbe Roads hatchery in Springdale, which has been in operations since the 1960s.

Tyson is investing approximately $31m in the new centre, which will commence operations in the third quarter of 2017. Once operational, the new plant will employ 35 people.

Location details

The new hatchery will be located in eastern Springdale, one of the biggest cities in north-west Arkansas and an important industrial hub for the region.

It will be at the corner of Huntsville Avenue and Monitor Road in Springdale. The location has been chosen due to its proximity to the downtown and also because of the company's commitment to revitalise downtown Springdale.

Details of Tyson Food's new incubation centre

The new incubation centre will have a built-up area of 75,000ft², and feature latest incubation and hatching techniques.

The construction involves world-class innovation with greater emphasis on technology, says Tyson Foods.

The facility will feature latest advancements in biosecurity measures designed to help promote overall bird health. Latest robotics technology will be installed in the plant for worker safety and ergonomics.

The centre will also feature state-of-the-art ventilation facilities and internal environmental controls.

Tyson Foods' other commitments to Springdale's revitalisation

In October 2015, Tyson Foods announced that it would contribute to the revitalisation of downtown Springdale with its new plans and vision for the area.

"Tyson is investing approximately $31m in the new centre, which will commence operations in the third quarter of 2017."

The company aims to transform the area into a hub of innovation, by bring commerce, food, arts and families together. It is collaborating with the Downtown Springdale Alliance, the Chamber of Commerce and other business leaders in the region to achieve the vision.

The company owns two buildings in the city's downtown, including its original headquarters located at 319 E. Emma Avenue in the heart of downtown Springdale and the adjacent building at 317 E. Emma Avenue, formerly known as the Brown Hatchery building.

A new, two-storey, 44,000ft² facility was proposed to be constructed between and behind the two older buildings. It will provide space for roughly 250 people, and is scheduled for completion in 2017. Other buildings on the site will be demolished once the new building begins operations.

The company further announced in January 2016 that it would renovate the 28,000ft² JTL Building located at 516 E. Emma. The renovated building will become the company's new store offering products and a limited selection of staple grocery items. It will be opened in spring 2016 and will employ 75 people.

Tyson Foods employs more than 6,000 people in Springdale and approximately 23,000 people in Arkansas. It takes help from more than 1,700 chicken farmers in the state for its operations. It also purchases cattle, pigs, grain, diesel and other utilities in Arkansas, and creates an economic impact of more than $1.6bn a year.

Marketing commentary on Tyson Foods

Headquartered in Springdale, Tyson Foods produces and sells chicken, beef and pork, as well as prepared foods such as breakfast sausages, turkey, lunchmeat, hot dogs, pizza crusts and toppings, tortillas and desserts. Some of its brands include Tyson, Jimmy Dean, Hillshire Farm, Sara Lee, Ball Park, Wright, Aidells and State Fair.

Tyson Foods' products are supplied to both retail and foodservice customers throughout the US and approximately 130 countries worldwide. The company employs more than 113,000 team members at more than 400 facilities and offices globally.