New report reveals almost 63% of UK people blame producers for food fraud


Almost 63% of people in the UK would blame producers for food fraud when compared with retailers, distributors and farmers, according to the National Farmers Union (NFU) Mutual Food Fraud Report 2017.

Coming at a time when the UK is preparing to exit EU, the report shows that food confidence in the country has declined significantly due to fraud cases such as the horse meat scandal.

The new research by the food and drink manufacturing insurer also reveals that only 12% of people have confidence in the European food chain and just 7% in the global chain, fewer than one in every ten people.

According to the report, nearly 72% people believe that there could be an issue with food fraud in the UK, and 27% revealed that they have personally experienced it.

“Producers are under immense pressure to offset price rises caused by the weakened value of sterling and higher import costs."

The survey has highlighted that nearly 33% of the people have little confidence in products and retailers in comparison to five years ago. Around 33% believe that food crime would increase in the future.

Red meat products and food supplements were rated as the least trusted products in the UK.

Only 9% still have a strong confidence on the food products available in the country.

NFU Mutual food and drink manufacturing specialist Darren Seward said: “There has never been a more important time for tackling food fraud and getting regulation right as we plan to leave the EU, but government proposals for where we will get our food from are already under tough scrutiny from industry and consumers alike with concerns over skilled labour and quality.

“Producers are under immense pressure to offset price rises caused by the weakened value of sterling and higher import costs, squeezing already tight budgets and resources and potentially cornering them into using cheaper global suppliers that may be more vulnerable to fraud.”

The NFU Mutual Food Fraud Report noted that because of the 'fraudulent practices', the UK food and drink industry could be losing up to £12bn per annum.